D R O W N   M E   I N   B E A U T Y



D e s i g n   A r c h i t e c t u r e   A r t   F a s h i o n






Jan 21
TEN TOWERS FOR THE TWIN TOWERS
I had to laugh when I got an email blast last week from a design magazine with the subject line “Koolhaas Comes Home, Completes Holland’s Largest Building.”  That kind of big, dumb pride in big, dumb buildings is antithetical to what Rem Koolhaas and his Amsterdam-based office OMA stood for.  If OMA have designed buildings recently, like the CCTV Tower in Shanghai, that seem big and dumb, it’s because their programs and sites (and clients) demanded it.
The email refers to De Rotterdam, the multi-use complex OMA just completed in that city.  It’s big, with over 1.7 million square feet of new commercial space.  (By comparison, each of the Twin Towers contained 3.8 million square foot of office space.)  But it’s not dumb.  Rather than a single super-high volume, the structure has been imagined as ten smaller volumes, bundled together, staggered in their heights above the ground and footprints on the ground.  These towers touch one another only cautiously, strategically, at certain corners, so that they’re tied together structurally, and so that inhabitants can move between them.  But each tower maintains its own volume, with windows along all of its open sides.  This arrangement makes for a building that is both massive and porous, with light, air and views rushing through it.  It’s a fine contemporary office building.
But when I look at photos of De Rotterdam what I see more than anything else is a tribute to the Twin Towers, though the project was not intended as such.  Each of its small towers is, like each of the Twin Towers, a square in plan.  Their full-height runs of window frame and window glass resemble the signature black-and-white striped skin of the Twin Towers.  And they have a similar starkness as the Twin Towers; their shapes are so restrained that they remain platonic.
The new building looks terribly handsome on the port in Rotterdam, but I think it would sit just as comfortably at the World Trade Center site in downtown Manhattan.  To include a structure like this in the new complex there — a big but not super-big building whose forms echo and reinvent those of the Twin Towers — would be a gorgeous response to their destruction.  De Rotterdam is like the Twin Towers but slighter, shattered, shifted, dancing.  It’s quietly heroic.
Photograph courtesy OMA © Michel van de Kar

TEN TOWERS FOR THE TWIN TOWERS

I had to laugh when I got an email blast last week from a design magazine with the subject line “Koolhaas Comes Home, Completes Holland’s Largest Building.”  That kind of big, dumb pride in big, dumb buildings is antithetical to what Rem Koolhaas and his Amsterdam-based office OMA stood for.  If OMA have designed buildings recently, like the CCTV Tower in Shanghai, that seem big and dumb, it’s because their programs and sites (and clients) demanded it.

The email refers to De Rotterdam, the multi-use complex OMA just completed in that city.  It’s big, with over 1.7 million square feet of new commercial space.  (By comparison, each of the Twin Towers contained 3.8 million square foot of office space.)  But it’s not dumb.  Rather than a single super-high volume, the structure has been imagined as ten smaller volumes, bundled together, staggered in their heights above the ground and footprints on the ground.  These towers touch one another only cautiously, strategically, at certain corners, so that they’re tied together structurally, and so that inhabitants can move between them.  But each tower maintains its own volume, with windows along all of its open sides.  This arrangement makes for a building that is both massive and porous, with light, air and views rushing through it.  It’s a fine contemporary office building.

But when I look at photos of De Rotterdam what I see more than anything else is a tribute to the Twin Towers, though the project was not intended as such.  Each of its small towers is, like each of the Twin Towers, a square in plan.  Their full-height runs of window frame and window glass resemble the signature black-and-white striped skin of the Twin Towers.  And they have a similar starkness as the Twin Towers; their shapes are so restrained that they remain platonic.

The new building looks terribly handsome on the port in Rotterdam, but I think it would sit just as comfortably at the World Trade Center site in downtown Manhattan.  To include a structure like this in the new complex there — a big but not super-big building whose forms echo and reinvent those of the Twin Towers — would be a gorgeous response to their destruction.  De Rotterdam is like the Twin Towers but slighter, shattered, shifted, dancing.  It’s quietly heroic.

Photograph courtesy OMA © Michel van de Kar


  1. un-seen-love reblogged this from star-gazing
  2. ratchetarts reblogged this from asapm0b
  3. lfxm reblogged this from sleepy-samurai
  4. so-irie reblogged this from predvtor
  5. utmostambassador reblogged this from assvssin
  6. alex-escalante reblogged this from lustfulxury
  7. lustfulxury reblogged this from engyne
  8. oliver-a-havannarol reblogged this from engyne
  9. keziaaeka reblogged this from engyne
  10. scorchtheearth2 reblogged this from engyne
  11. engyne reblogged this from predvtor
  12. zwpe reblogged this from fuckducky
  13. ducky6441 reblogged this from cixelsid
  14. cedalion reblogged this from aeh
  15. r3xtoration reblogged this from aeh
  16. yung--blood reblogged this from miuwmiuww and added:
    My hometownn
  17. adrian-tiwi06 reblogged this from azeex
  18. miuwmiuww reblogged this from predvtor
  19. rebelez29 reblogged this from predvtor
  20. scurus reblogged this from predvtor
  21. great-atlas reblogged this from aeh
  22. fancydat reblogged this from aeh
  23. sexlourde reblogged this from predvtor
  24. fifty-percent-exotic reblogged this from predvtor
  25. predvtor reblogged this from assvssin
  26. sassyybtch reblogged this from assvssin
  27. turnofftheemotions reblogged this from cixelsid
  28. cixelsid reblogged this from assvssin
  29. fuckducky reblogged this from assvssin
  30. sleepy-samurai reblogged this from assvssin
  31. assvssin reblogged this from aeh
  32. appleashes reblogged this from tengen-toppa
  33. azeex reblogged this from aeh
  34. untitledlandscape reblogged this from aeh